Tag Archives: Brandenburg

English Chamber Orchistra, Conducted by Johannes Somary: J.S. Bach- The Brandenburg Concertos (1-6 Complete)

Updates:
The Animals- Boom Boom EP (Columbia, reissued by ABKCO): This one was an interesting find. I bought it two weeks ago at Newbury Comics. I guess only about 1,400 were pressed. I was pretty lucky to find it.

The Decemberists- The King is Dead (Capitol): Back at Newbury again. The store near my parents’ house is small & doesn’t really have the best selection, but every once in a while, I find something I love. This is one of my favorite albums of all time, so when I saw it, I had to get it.

NOTE: After this post, I’m going to start doing my updates a little differently. I’ll posting a link to my page called, “The Record Collection.” Here, you can see my entire collection, complete with links to reviews I’ve written.

 

English Chamber Orchestra, Conducted by Johannes Somary: J.S. Bach- The Brandenburg Concertos (1-6, Complete):
I fell in love with these works about five years ago, in a music history class. The one that stood out to me was the Brandenburg Concerto N0.3 in G Major. I immediately went home sought out the entire collection on iTunes & since then, they’ve become my go-to classical pieces, when I feel like listening. Since then, they’ve continued to fascinate me the most out of any classical music.

Jump forward five years.

If I know there’s a used record shop around, I’m stopping in. Period. Northampton, Massachusetts is no different, with Turn it Up!. This place is absolutely great. As you walk in, it smells the way a record store that sells used vinyl should: like old dusty cardboard. Half the store consists of CDs & cassettes, while the other half is where you can find the LPs. If I were a kid, that half of the store would be my candy shop.

Anyway, during a trip to Northampton for a Stephen Kellogg show, we made a pit stop & I picked up three or four records. I was all set to leave, when I glanced over to see my lovely girlfriend at the dollar bin, holding an old, extremely dusty, ex-library-owned copy of a Sesame Street record. I smiled at the sight (she’s in school to be a children’s librarian) & in realizing I had forgotten to check there, I headed over.

For those of you who haven’t seen a record store dollar bin, this part of the shop is a small shelf which is full of records that most people aren’t looking to buy & ones that aren’t in very good condition. Needless to say, my hopes weren’t too high. I flipped through the old records & found a US release of Rubber Soul. The cover was ripped & the record was in atrocious condition, so I moved on.

After a few minutes of rummaging through the seemingly bottomless pile of vinyl & cardboard, I finally came across a fairly inconspicuous looking double album. For some reason, instead of flipping past it, I picked it up. To my surprise, it was a recording of J.S. Bach’s Brandenburg Concertos in their entirety. My favorite classical pieces for a dollar? Absolutely. I scooped the record up immediately & added it to the bunch of records I was about to buy.

 

History:
I’d be lying to you if I were to tell you I’m an expert on any classical music from any era. I never studied it in any depth & I sure don’t know how to play it. That being said, here’s a little history on my favorite composer & my favorite of his collections.

The Brandenburg Concerto collection was given & dedicated to Christian Ludwig of Brandenburg, which was then a region of Prussia. Originally, titled, Six Concerts avec Plusieurs Instruments (French for: Six Concerts with Many Instruments) was presented in 1721, but most likely written beforehand.

Some sources claim that, despite their widespread acclaim today, Bach may never have heard the works performed. Shortly after presenting them to his commissioner, he took up a position as music director in the city of Leipzig. The composer would remain there until his death in 1750. Once there, the music he made in the many of the prominent churches began to overshadow is previous compositions & much of the early sheet music was stored away.

It wasn’t until almost a century later, to celebrate the one hundredth anniversary of his death that these concertos were rediscovered & became known as game-changers. Bach used many instruments, often in very unorthodox styles. For example, the music we listened to in my class, No. 3 in G Major, was the first piece to feature a harpsichord in the forefront. Up until then, the instrument was mainly used to play chords & less intricate parts to the music. Harpsichords were almost strictly accompaniment instruments. However, in this piece, Bach wrote a solo for the instrument. The world now saw that harpsichords were much more versatile than previously thought.

Either way, the Brandenburg Concertos have become known across the world as some of the best Baroque pieces ever composed. I’d have to agree.

If you’d like to dive further into the history of these works, you can get a very detailed explanation here.

 

Cover Art/Vinyl Quality:
There isn’t much artwork on this one. The gate-fold record jacket is blue with swirls of purple. There’s no real design.

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Cover Art for The Brandenburg Concertos

It’s a double album, in the same format as Hanson’s Anthem or The Decemberists’ The Crane Wife. The two discs have three or four tracks per side. This one is a little different than the others, though & the difference is in the length of the track. Baroque pieces tend to be quite a bit longer than rock songs, so even though there are only three to four tracks on a  side, one side of this album works out to be about the same length as a side on a seven-track-per-side rock record. All in all, the entire collection runs for about an hour & forty minutes, or about double the length of a standard LP.

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The Double LP

The vinyl discs are in surprisingly good condition for spending time in a dollar bin for who knows how long. Most of the other records were stored in the same way & were scratched, gouged & their covers & sleeves were falling apart. On the other hand, The Brandenburg Concertos’ discs were among the few that were only a little dusty from sitting unplayed in their sleeves for a while. When I got home, all I had to do was wipe the vinyl down with my record cleaning kid, making the album was good for a spin on the turntable.

 

Sound:
Just a little disclaimer here: When it comes to classical music, I am not an audiophile, but I can point out a few things. Being a different recording than the one I had from my course, I could pick discrepancies between this recording & the one I had from school, almost right away. The audio mix was a little different, with some noticeable differences between the way the prominent instruments were presented, which made the sound of the mix (despite the fact that a record always will sound fuller, it was definitely the mix & not the fact that it was a vinyl recording) a little warmer. The overall tempo was also slower. All of these things were just fine with me;  you have to expect some elements to change from recording to recording. They’re different performances, with different key elements, such as the musicians, the producer & the conductor, all of whom have personal artistic visions. There isn’t a ton more I can speak to, but I will say that the sound of the music filling your bedroom as you try to relax beats the tinny sound from ear-buds or computer speakers any day.

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The Vanguard label

Final Thoughts:
I was really lucky to find this double album & am glad I decided to pick it up. I really enjoyed listening to these pieces & am looking forward to playing them many times to come. Finally able to listen to them through real speakers is quite the musical experience & I’m grateful to be able to have access to a sound which is as close to what Bach had intended.

You can find different versions of The Brandenburg Concertos on CD & mp3, anywhere, really. This specific vinyl release from Vanguard can also be found on eBay, for between five & twenty dollars, but don’t forget to check your dollar bin!

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